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Flag Football (K thru 2nd Grade)

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Kindergarten Flag at halftime ERHS varsity game August 29, 2013

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Why Flag?

Learning physical skills. Young athletes learn both fundamental motor skills (e.g., running, jumping and hopping) and sport-specific skills (e.g., how to throw or catch a football) that allow them to stay active.

Appreciation of fitness. Two of the motives for participation identified by children is “to get exercise” and “stay in shape” (Ewing & Seefeldt; 1989)

Sense of belonging. Another strong motive of participation is social interaction. Sports can provide peer interaction through both teammates and healthy competition (see Weiss & Stuntz, 2004 for a review of the literature).

Acquiring sport skills for leisure. Learning the fundamental motor skills through sport (e.g., proprioception, coordination) can aid in skill development, but can also be transferred to other sports and leisure activities, promoting increased participation and involvement.

Flag football gives every child the chance to be an impact player. Kids of all sizes are throwing and catching the ball, making interceptions, pulling flags on defense and running for 50-yard touchdowns – all while having a good time, making friends, getting exercise and learning.

According to the Sports and Fitness Industry Association, nationwide in 2013, over 2.5 million youth participated in flag football – just shy of the numbers playing tackle and touch football.

A fun and exciting sport that is played year around, kids learn football skills while understanding the importance of maintaining good form and footwork. they'll learn the fundamentals of the sport and compete with other players who love the game as much as they do.

Flag football is a non-contact sport, and provides a safe activity for kids who love football.

Join us. There's a reason our numbers are growing!

Research in Youth Sports

By Ryan Hedstrom & Daniel Gould Institute for the Study of Youth Sports College of Education Department of Kinesiology Michigan State University Room 210 IM Sports Circle East Lansing, MI 48824-1049 517-432-0175 (phone) 517-353-5363 (fax) drgould@msu.edu

Preventing Injuries

Don’t let injuries sideline young athletes Physical injuries occur frequently in all youth sports, but parents can take steps to reduce their budding athlete’s risk of getting seriously hurt.

Jim LeClaire

Director of Flag Football